Monkeypox – Facts, vs Fiction and Fear Mongering

Monkeypox: Facts, vs Fiction and Fear Mongering

July 26, 2022 – From the Epoch Times:

World Health Organization declaration of Monkey Pox as a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern” (PHEIC), was made by one man, WHO Director-General Tedros, who has no medical training, over the objection of the majority of his own expert committee of medical and scientific advisors.

Monkeypox Facts

  1. 98% of Cases are among homosexual men

To quote Rosamund Lewis, the WHO technical lead for monkeypox, in a press conference July 20, 2022: “About 98 percent of (Monkeypox) cases are among men who have sex with men–and primarily those who have multiple recent anonymous or new partners.” She then said they are typically of young age and chiefly in urban areas.”

2. What is Monkeypox?

Monkeypox is one of several different “POX” virus infections, though it is much milder than Smallpox (variola virus), which was essentially eradicated with the successful long-standing world-wide vaccination. It is a DNA virus, more stable than RNA viruses like COVID, Marburg, Ebola, Lassa and others. Milder diseases Cowpox, Horsepox, Camelpox, and Vaccinia are others in this group.

Monkeypox has been known in Africa primarily as a disease of ground squirrels since 1958. It is one type of zoonotic viral infections. Zoonotic means a virus that lives in an animal host (e.g., ground squirrels) but can spread to monkeys and humans with close contact and poor hygiene

3. How does one catch Monkeypox?

As the WHO expert just confirmed July 20, 2022, Monkeypox is spread mainly between men having sex with men. Women can be infected by semen ejaculated in the vagina by an infected man. The virus causes a viremia in the blood stream that causes the skin lesions (pustules). The virus in the blood stream also means there is live virus in bodily secretions: saliva, semen, blood, open skin lesions, pox scabs, vaginal secretions, feces, and soiled linens or clothing from an infected person.

Other than direct sexual contact, humans can be infected with monkeypox when they come into direct contact with an infected animal or person’s blood, body fluids or feces. It can then spread to other humans who have direct contact with bodily secretions from infected, symptomatic people.

4. Will wearing a mask help protect against Monkeypox?

Monkey Pox is not a respiratory virus. It is far easier to control spread of monkeypox than to control spread of influenza, COVID-19 or the common cold that are spread by coughing and sneezing in respiratory droplets.

In order to control the spread of monkeypox, you don’t need masks, mass lockdowns and quarantines for everyone. You simply need to avoid direct contact with bodily secretions of an infected person!

5. Who is at risk of catching Monkeypox?

Basically, the risk factors are the same as any zoonotic disease: humans coming in contact with animal carriers of the virus. In Africa the pattern has been mostly children who bring home sick animals, which are then eaten.

Outside of Africa, individuals most at risk for contracting monkeypox are men having sex with men. The recent outbreak occurred in Central and West Africa with those who had close contact with an infected person or animal. The larger outbreaks that spread to other countries first in Europe primarily were traced to the large international PRIDE event in the Canary Islands earlier this spring.

In addition to men having sex with men, others at risk of serious Monkeypox illness include:

  • Individuals living in unsanitary conditions or areas with little to no medical services
  • Individuals who have vaccine-induced immune deficiency syndrome following the COVID experimental shots
  • Immunocompromised people, which occurs in cancer therapy, chronic illness, after organ transplants, or after radiation exposure (“Havana Syndrome”), exposure to toxic chemicals, such as pesticides and others.

Link to full article at The Epoch Times: https://www.theepochtimes.com/monkeypox-virus-facts-vs-fear_4621615.html?utm_source=ai&utm_medium=search

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